Journal of Research in Medical Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 110-

Assessing abdominal aortic calcifications before performing colocolic or colorectal anastomoses: A case–control study


Sophie Deguelte1, Romain Besson2, Louis Job3, Christine Hoeffel4, Damien Jolly6, Reza Kianmanesh5 
1 Department of Digestive Surgery, Robert Debré Hospital, Reims University Hospital; Reims Medical School, EA 3797, 51095; Reims Medical School, University of Champagne Ardennes; Reims Medical School, University of Champagne Ardennes, Reims, France
2 Department of Digestive Surgery, Robert Debré Hospital, Reims University Hospital, Reims, France
3 Department of Radiology, Robert Debré Hospital, Reims University Hospital, Reims, France
4 Department of Radiology, Robert Debré Hospital, Reims University Hospital; Reims Medical School, University of Champagne Ardennes, Reims, France
5 Department of Digestive Surgery, Robert Debré Hospital, Reims University Hospital; Reims Medical School, University of Champagne Ardennes, Reims, France

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sophie Deguelte
8 Rue Du General Koenig, Reims 51100
France

Background: Preoperative evaluation needs objective measurement of the risk of anastomotic leakage (AL). This study aimed to determine if cardiovascular disease, evaluated by abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), was associated with AL after colorectal anastomoses. We conducted a retrospective case–control study on patients who underwent colorectal anastomosis between 2012 and 2016 at Reims University Hospital (France). Abdominal aortic calcification was the main variable of measurement. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all patients who had a left-sided colocolic or a colorectal anastomosis, all patients with AL were cases; 2 controls, or 3 when possible, without AL were randomly selected and matched by operation type, pathology, and age. For multivariate analysis, 2 logistic regression models were tested, the first one used the calcification rate as a continuous variable and the second one used the calcification rate ≥ 5% as a qualitative variable. Results: Forty-five cases and 116 controls were included. In univariate analysis, the calcification rate and the percentage of patients with a calcification rate ≥5% were significantly higher in cases than in control groups (4.4 ± 5.5% vs. 2.5 ± 5.2%, odds ratio [OR] =1.6 95% CI: 1.1–2.5; n = 22, 49% and n = 34.3 3%, OR = 2.8 95% CI: 1.2–6.2). In multivariate models, calcification rate as a continuous variable and calcification rate ≥5% as qualitative variable were independent significant risk factors for AL (respectively, aOR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1–3, P = 0.01; aOR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4–7.55, P < 0.01). Conclusion: AAC ≥5% should alert on a higher risk of AL and should lead to discussion about the decision of performing an anastomosis.


How to cite this article:
Deguelte S, Besson R, Job L, Hoeffel C, Jolly D, Kianmanesh R. Assessing abdominal aortic calcifications before performing colocolic or colorectal anastomoses: A case–control study.J Res Med Sci 2021;26:110-110


How to cite this URL:
Deguelte S, Besson R, Job L, Hoeffel C, Jolly D, Kianmanesh R. Assessing abdominal aortic calcifications before performing colocolic or colorectal anastomoses: A case–control study. J Res Med Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 May 17 ];26:110-110
Available from: https://www.jmsjournal.net/article.asp?issn=1735-1995;year=2021;volume=26;issue=1;spage=110;epage=110;aulast=Deguelte;type=0