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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 54

Gut microbiota profile in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and presumed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis


1 Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
4 Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, USA
5 Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
6 Research Informatics Core, Research Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
7 Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
8 Digestive Disease Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Faraz Bishehsari
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois
USA
Hossein Poustchi
Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, North Kargar Street, Tehran 1411713135
Iran
Dr. Shahin Merat
Digestive Disease Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.jrms_673_21

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Background: The main composition of intestinal microbiota in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients has not yet been elucidated. In this, case-control study, we identified differences of intestinal microbiota in male patients with NAFLD, presumed NASH, and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: We compared gut microbial composition of 25 patients with NAFLD, 13 patients with presumed NASH, and 12 healthy controls. Demographic information as well as clinical, nutritional, and physical activity data was gathered. Stool and blood samples were collected to perform the laboratory analysis. The taxonomic composition of gut microbiota was assessed using V4 regions of microbial small subunit ribosomal Ribonucleic acid genes sequencing of stool samples. Results: Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the most frequently phyla in all groups. Our results revealed that Veillonella was the only genus with significantly different amounts in presumed NASH patients compared with patients with NAFLD (P = 2.76 × 10−6, q = 2.07 × 10−4, logFC = 5.52). Conclusion: This pilot study was the first study to compare gut microbial composition in patients with NAFLD and presumed NASH in the Middle East. Given the potential effects of gut microbiota on the management and prevention of NAFLD, larger, prospective studies are recommended to confirm this study's findings.


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